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Online Courses for Radiologic Technologist

A complete listing of currently available online programs is provided below. To access course materials click an available viewing format provided with each listing (PDF, HTML5, Webinar). To access online exams and claim credit, courses must be selected and added to your Guerbet CE User Record. In order to view course content you must be registered and logged in.

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*Enhancing Patient Safety and Optimizing Efficiency in CT, MRI and Cath Labs:
Integrating the Use of Contrast Media Dispensed in Prefilled Syringes
Faculty: Douglas Boyd, R.T. (R) (MR)
Expiration Date: July 31, 2021
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
17905

Every day, radiology departments balance the often competing interests of efficiency, cost and patient safety. When a single medical technology product delivers improvements in each of these areas, the adoption of its use can be transformative. Prefilled contrast media syringes are such a product, and the benefits in efficiency, cost savings, and patient safety associated with their use is highlighted by a number of recent studies. Join Douglas S. Boyd R.T.(R)(MR), MRI Supervisor and PET/MRI Supervisor for the nation’s largest VA Hospital, for an engaging and practical session that will provide a comprehensive examination of the use of prefilled contrast media.

Educational Objectives

  • Discuss the potential infection risks involved with the use of contrast dispensed from multi-dose and bulk-pack containers
  • Review recommendations from SIPC, CMS, CDC, and the Joint Commission regarding injection safety
  • Describe how contrast media dispensed in prefilled syringes can improve patient safety
  • Identify ways in which contrast media dispensed in prefilled syringes can optimize workflow and throughput in radiology departments and cath labs

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Webinar
Advanced MRI Safety Training For 
MRI Healthcare Professionals:
Level 2 MR Personnel – Updated Edition
Faculty: Frank G. Shellock, PhD, FACC, FACR, FACSM
Expiration Date: April 30, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 2.5
Tuition: No Charge
17622

This program reviews fundamental MRI safety protocols and meets the annual training recommendations from the American College of Radiology. Importantly, MRI facilities must now comply with the revised requirements for diagnostic imaging from The Joint Commission and document that MRI technologists participate in ongoing education that includes annual training on safe MRI practices in the MRI environment. As such, Advanced MRI Safety Training for Healthcare Professionals, Level 2 MR Personnel covers each MRI safety topic specified by The Joint Commission, as well as many additional subjects that will expand the knowledge-base of healthcare professionals.

With more than 30 years of experience in the field of MRI, the author of the best-selling textbook series, the Reference Manual for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Implants and Devices, and the creator of the internationally popular website, www.MRIsafety.com, Dr. Frank G. Shellock is uniquely qualified to present the information in this program.

Advanced MRI Safety Training for Healthcare Professionals, Level 2 MR Personnel is a 150-minute program that is divided into three sections.

Educational Objectives

  • Understand the safety issues related to MRI.
  • Describe the bioeffects associated with the static magnetic field, time-varying magnetic, and radiofrequency fields.
  • Present guidelines that prevent projectile-related accdents.
  • Describe polices that avoid issues related to acoustic noise.
  • Review procedures that prevent burns associated with MRI.
  • Explain and demonstrate appropriate pre-MRI screening procedures.
  • Identify techniques to manage patients with claustrophobia, anxiety, or emotional distress.
  • Describe guidelines to handle medical emergencies in the MRI setting.
  • Identify safety considerations for gadolinium-based contrast agents.

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Webinar
Basic MRI Safety Training:
Level 1 MR Personnel - Updated Edition
Faculty: Frank G. Shellock, PhD, FACC, FACR, FACSM
Expiration Date: April 30, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
16898

Anyone who enters the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment, whether on a regular or infrequent basis, must be properly trained to ensure their safety, the protection of patients, and the security of other facility staff members. This program, Basic MRI Safety Training, Level 1 MR Personnel accomplishes the initial training that is necessary to ensure safety in the unique setting associated with the MRI system. It includes information pertaining to MRI technology, describes common hazards and unique dangers associated with the MRI setting, and presents vital recommendations and guidelines to prevent accidents and injuries. Importantly, this program provides the fundamental MRI safety information for Level I MR Personnel recommended by the American College of Radiology and may be utilized by individuals desiring preparation for safety training as, Level 2 MR Personnel.

With more than 30 years of experience in the field of MRI, the author of the best-selling textbook series, the Reference Manual for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Implants and Devices, and the creator of the internationally popular website, www.MRIsafety.com, Dr. Frank G. Shellock is uniquely qualified to present the information in this program.

Educational Objectives

  • Appreciate the importance of MRI
  • Identify the hazards associated with MRI
  • Understand the screening process
  • Describe steps to prevent accidents and injuries

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Webinar
Contrast Safety
Faculty: Vanessa L. Lewis Williams, MD
Expiration Date: March 31, 2021
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
17835

The administration of contrast agents is an essential part of many diagnostic imaging procedures. The use of such agents can dramatically improve the visibility and characterization of many pathological issues.

Knowledge, familiarity, and practice are crucial for an appropriate and effective use of contrast and the response to adverse events when they occur. Therefore, it is vital for radiologists to understand the agents they inject, the contra-indications for injection, and any potential associated risks, in order to act and react accordingly in a timely manner.

Furthermore, the spread of infections through the use of contrast has also been a growing concern. Costly medications and severe drug shortages have encouraged the inappropriate reuse of single-dose vials which has led to serious and fatal infections. A thorough understanding of infection control best practices is needed to ensure the safety of patients undergoing diagnostic imaging.

Educational Objectives

  • Review the major categories of contrast
  • Identify FDA-approved gadolinium-based contrast agents and their mechanisms of action
  • Review the evidence describing gadolinium retention in the body
  • Evaluate the safety of gadolinium-based contrast to determine the risk/benefit in an individual patient
  • Apply recent guidelines and recommendations for the management of patients who require the use of Contrast
  • Describe the critical need for infection control when administering contrast
  • Discuss the recommendations and benefits of single-dose vials and prefilled syringes in reducing infections
  • Know appropriate steps to follow when an adverse reaction occurs

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Webinar
Eliminating Medical Errors in Radiology
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: October 31, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
16518

It is essential that all who work in healthcare, particularly those who provide care and services to hospitalized patients, become actively involved in the identification and reporting of errors and in the development of approaches and solutions to avoid the commission of medical errors. The magnitude and the impact of these medical errors make this a problem for everyone and not one that can be resolved by a committee or a variety of project teams. The responsibility rests with each and every person in the system.

Authors today are openly addressing the issue of accountability in the provision of care to patients and, “most doctors and hospital administrators agree that accountability is a good thing” (Makary, 2012 p. 193). Identifying and reporting of errors is an essential demonstration of accountability. It is also recognized that assuming this accountability and ramifications of identifying and reporting errors takes considerable time that many practitioners do not believe is available to them. Using technology to assist in these processes and depending on all members of the team to help each other achieve this level of accountability can make these behaviors a part of one’s daily practice and belief systems.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Provide examples of staff involvement in the commission of medical errors that occur in a Radiology Department.
  • Discuss three to seven factors that contribute to the commission of medical errors in a healthcare facility.
  • Identify steps that should be taken to create and maintain a safe environment in which to provide care to patients.
  • Describe steps that can be taken to provide control over the introduction of process changes, in-services and announcements.
  • Define the effect of opting-out and the steps that can be taken to eliminate this practice.
  • Discuss the importance and requirements surrounding the practice of providing information each time the care of a patient is transferred from one provider to another.
  • List practices that support the safe administration of medications, including the five rights of medication administration.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

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Joint Commission Medication Management Standards In Radiology - 3rd Edition
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: December 31, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 4.0
Tuition: No Charge
17598

The Joint Commission Medication Management Standards (Joint Commission) are among the most rigorous and challenging for an organization to implement, according to the article, Maintaining Compliance (Kienle, Uselton, Lee, 2008). Medication management standards, revised in 2014, (The Joint Commission, 2013) address all stages of the medication processes and are no longer viewed as primarily a pharmacy responsibility. The management of medications is considered a system-wide responsibility that impacts every clinical area in the facility.

Imaging services are assuming a more visible role in healthcare facilities. This increased visibility is directly related to the rapid development of sophisticated diagnostic technology as well as the increasing therapeutic use of imaging technology. As would be anticipated with this increase in activity and level of intervention, more regulations are being imposed to support the provision of safe and effective services.

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Providing Safe Patient Care by Preventing Healthcare Acquired Conditions and Serious Reportable Events:
Revised Edition
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: February 29, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 4.0
Tuition: No Charge
17025

Many studies have demonstrated that one of the major causes of the increase in healthcare costs is related to unexpected treatment needed as the result of a medical error, a Serious Reportable Events, and/or a healthcare acquired condition.  While many insurers, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, have stopped reimbursing hospitals for care and treatment needed following the commission of specifically defined medical errors, those costs still remain part of patient care delivery, leading to a reduction in funding available for other components of healthcare.

All who are involved in the delivery of patient care should be knowledgeable of, and fully implement infection-control programs, as well as any initiative put in place to avoid Never-Events/Serious Reportable Events, from occurring in the healthcare setting. The transformation needs to occur in the culture of the provision of healthcare to include a clear expectation of the individual responsibility of EACH person who is providing care.

This program will educate the healthcare provider on ways they can make a difference in the commitment of errors and reportable events during patient care.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Identify the major events in the history leading to the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 addressing costs of never-events to the healthcare system
  • Describe the basis for transformation of inpatient care as this relates to elimination of Serious Reportable Events
  • Discuss the needed cultural changes to successfully implement the transformation of inpatient care to the level of safety desired
  • Discuss critical aspects of infection control as they relate to the elimination of hospital-acquired infections
  • List the benefits of patient centered care as it relates to prevention of medical errors and Serious Reportable Events
  • Discuss the impact of identifying Serious Reportable Events and the potential for litigation if a Serious Reportable Events occurs
  • Discuss the accountability factor as it relates to Serious Reportable Events
  • Describe effective approaches to care delivery aimed at preventing Serious Reportable Event

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

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Quality Improvement in the MRI Suite
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: June 30, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
16223

According to the National Institute of Health (NIH), Radiology is one of the specialties most likely to be the subject of claims of medical negligence.

There have been many serious injuries, including death, to individuals who inadvertently entered the MRI Suite and are injured by the force of the magnet on projectiles, etc.  Significant time must be spent providing education on MRI safety to those who will be practicing in that area or to those whose duties may take him/her into the MRI Suite.

“Quality is not a static goal but a progressively improving state, and Interventional Radiology is a rapidly moving, technology-driven subspecialty in which high-quality patient care should be the norm” (Steele. R. et al.).  These non-static functions make the study of quality in interventional radiology challenging and motivating as clinicians work to reach the point where this care is available at the highest quality level for those who need what this technology has to offer.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Describe medical errors, medical mistakes, and adverse events.
  • Discuss the basic elements of continuous quality improvement.
  • Discuss the value of peer review regarding safe/quality healthcare.
  • Discuss the value of peer review regarding continuous quality improvement.
  • Describe the value of Deming’s 14 rules for quality improvement.
  • Identify significant components of a departmental CQI plan.
  • Briefly describe the components of the basic ethics of healthcare as they relate to quality.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

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Radiation Dosing
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: January 31, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 3.5
Tuition: No Charge
16111

The Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alert (Number 47) focused on how to reduce risks related to the use of ionizing radiation while still maintaining a high level of quality of the image being obtained. While efforts to address the radiological exposure risks were being made by the FDA and CMS, “legislation mandating the monitoring of radiation dose and reporting of any radiation dose incidents” (itn, 2014) was passed in California and Texas moving issues related to radiation exposure from the ‘should do’ to the ‘must do’ position.

The legislation from California and Texas led to other states and professional organizations to increase the emphasis on radiation safety practices. The Joint Commission, looking to develop standardization of these practices, introduced a set of New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards in December, 2013 (Mullens, 2014). While Joint Commission Standards are not considered law in the legal sense, they do carry the weight of ‘law’ when considered from the certification perspective since Joint Commission certification (or comparable certification from another accepted organization) is needed to participate in Medicare and Medicaid programs and with many other insurance providers.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Discuss the brief history of the development of x-rays using ionizing radiation.
  • Identify ways in which people are exposed to radiation.
  • Discuss the intent of “As Low as Reasonably Achievable”.
  • Describe the relationship between medication reconciliation and recording of radiation exposures.
  • Define the dilemma that exists with the use of diagnostic radiation.
  • List the negative effects of radiation exposure.
  • Describe the intent of the Joint Commission Sentinel Event 47.
  • Discuss the steps, required by CMS, to be taken to reduce radiation exposure.
  • List the Joint Commission standards to be achieved as phase one of the newly defined standards to be achieved by 2015.
  • Describe meaningful use and radiology as it impacts radiation exposure.
  • Define major points included in the FDA news release of Feb. 9, 2010.
  • Discuss Imaging Gently and Imaging Wisely.
  • Discuss progress toward radiation dosing standards.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

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Radiology and Radiation Safety in the Delivery of Patient Care
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: August 31, 2020
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
16372

This course will describe the care and safety of the patient receiving non-interventional radiographic procedures and additional aspects of patient care being provided by the Radiology staff. Patient safety is defined as the prevention of harm and is a “fundamental right of all Americans” (Kizer & Blum, nd). Achieving this safe care is complex, and there are many obstacles in the way of accomplishing this level of care. It is recommended that all healthcare organizations make the safety of the patient a priority when delivering care and services to that patient. This priority can be introduced and implemented by the executive committee of the facility establishing patient safety programs with defined executive responsibility and with the creation of a culture of safety

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Pinpoint steps that should be taken to create and maintain a safe environment in which to provide care to patients.
  • Name the components of a Patient Safety Program.
  • Identify the two major groups of patient’s rights.
  • Describe an example of an error’s classification system.
  • Define Sentinel Event and provide an example of one addressing radiology services.
  • Discuss alternatives to punishing people for making mistakes.
  • Describe a method using an everyday product to improve patient safety.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

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