Topics of Interest

Online Courses for Radiology Administrator

A complete listing of currently available online programs is provided below. To access course materials click an available viewing format provided with each listing (PDF, HTML5, Webinar). To access online exams and claim credit, courses must be selected and added to your Guerbet CE User Record. In order to view course content you must be registered and logged in.

Sort by: Title | Newest
Advanced MRI Safety Training For Healthcare Professionals (4th Edition) Level 2 MR Personnel
Faculty: Frank G. Shellock, PhD, FACC, FACR, FACSM
Expiration Date: March 31, 2024
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
18944

This program reviews fundamental MRI safety information and meets the annual training recommendations from the American College of Radiology. Importantly, MRI facilities must now comply with the revised requirements for diagnostic imaging from The Joint Commission and document that MRI technologists participate in ongoing education that includes annual training on safe MRI practices in the MRI environment. Notably, Advanced MRI Safety Training for Healthcare Professionals, Level 2 MR Personnel covers each MRI safety topic specified by The Joint Commission, as well as many additional subjects that will expand the knowledge-base of healthcare professionals involved with MRI technology.

With 35 years of experience in the field of MRI, the author of the best-selling textbook series, the Reference Manual for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Implants and Devices, and the creator of the internationally popular website, MRIsafety.com, Dr. Frank G. Shellock is uniquely qualified to present the information in this program.

Advanced MRI Safety Training for Healthcare Professionals (4th Edition), Level 2 MR Personnel is a 2 hour and 45 minute program that is divided into three different sections.

Educational Objectives

  • Understand the safety issues related to MRI.
  • Describe the bioeffects associated with the static magnetic field, time-varying magnetic fields, and radiofrequency fields.
  • Present guidelines that prevent projectile-related accidents.
  • Describe polices that avoid issues related to acoustic noise.
  • Review procedures that prevent burns associated with MRI.
  • Explain and demonstrate appropriate pre-MRI screening procedures.
  • Identify techniques to manage patients with claustrophobia, anxiety, or emotional distress.
  • Describe guidelines to handle medical emergencies in the MRI setting.
  • Understand the safety considerations for gadolinium-based contrast agents.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

Webinar
Basic MRI Safety Training: Level 1 MR Personnel - Updated Edition
Faculty: Frank G. Shellock, PhD, FACC, FACR, FACSM
Expiration Date: April 30, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
16930

Anyone who enters the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) environment, whether on a regular or infrequent basis, must be properly trained to ensure their safety, the protection of patients, and the security of other facility staff members. This program, Basic MRI Safety Training, Level 1 MR Personnel accomplishes the initial training that is necessary to ensure safety in the unique setting associated with the MRI system. It includes information pertaining to MRI technology, describes common hazards and unique dangers associated with the MRI setting, and presents vital recommendations and guidelines to prevent accidents and injuries. Importantly, this program provides the fundamental MRI safety information for Level I MR Personnel recommended by the American College of Radiology and may be utilized by individuals desiring preparation for safety training as, Level 2 MR Personnel.

With more than 30 years of experience in the field of MRI, the author of the best-selling textbook series, the Reference Manual for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Implants and Devices, and the creator of the internationally popular website, www.MRIsafety.com, Dr. Frank G. Shellock is uniquely qualified to present the information in this program.

Educational Objectives

  • Appreciate the importance of MRI
  • Identify the hazards associated with MRI
  • Understand the screening process
  • Describe steps to prevent accidents and injuries

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

Webinar
Contrast Safety
Faculty: Vanessa L. Lewis Williams, MD
Expiration Date: April 30, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
17836

The administration of contrast agents is an essential part of many diagnostic imaging procedures. The use of such agents can dramatically improve the visibility and characterization of many pathological issues.

Knowledge, familiarity, and practice are crucial for an appropriate and effective use of contrast and the response to adverse events when they occur. Therefore, it is vital for radiologists to understand the agents they inject, the contra-indications for injection, and any potential associated risks, in order to act and react accordingly in a timely manner.

Furthermore, the spread of infections through the use of contrast has also been a growing concern. Costly medications and severe drug shortages have encouraged the inappropriate reuse of single-dose vials which has led to serious and fatal infections. A thorough understanding of infection control best practices is needed to ensure the safety of patients undergoing diagnostic imaging.

Educational Objectives

  • Review the major categories of contrast
  • Identify FDA-approved gadolinium-based contrast agents and their mechanisms of action
  • Review the evidence describing gadolinium retention in the body
  • Evaluate the safety of gadolinium-based contrast to determine the risk/benefit in an individual patient
  • Apply recent guidelines and recommendations for the management of patients who require the use of Contrast
  • Describe the critical need for infection control when administering contrast
  • Discuss the recommendations and benefits of single-dose vials and prefilled syringes in reducing infections
  • Know appropriate steps to follow when an adverse reaction occurs

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

Webinar
Eliminating Medical Errors in Radiology
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: February 28, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
20094

It is essential that all who work in healthcare, particularly those who provide care and services to hospitalized patients, become actively involved in the identification and reporting of errors and in the development of approaches and solutions to avoid the commission of medical errors. The magnitude and the impact of these medical errors make this a problem for everyone and not one that can be resolved by a committee or a variety of project teams. The responsibility rests with each and every person in the system.

Authors today are openly addressing the issue of accountability in the provision of care to patients and, “most doctors and hospital administrators agree that accountability is a good thing” (Makary, 2012 p. 193). Identifying and reporting of errors is an essential demonstration of accountability. It is also recognized that assuming this accountability and ramifications of identifying and reporting errors takes considerable time that many practitioners do not believe is available to them. Using technology to assist in these processes and depending on all members of the team to help each other achieve this level of accountability can make these behaviors a part of one’s daily practice and belief systems.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Provide examples of staff involvement in the commission of medical errors that occur in a Radiology Department.
  • Discuss three to seven factors that contribute to the commission of medical errors in a healthcare facility.
  • Identify steps that should be taken to create and maintain a safe environment in which to provide care to patients.
  • Describe steps that can be taken to provide control over the introduction of process changes, in-services and announcements.
  • Define the effect of opting-out and the steps that can be taken to eliminate this practice.
  • Discuss the importance and requirements surrounding the practice of providing information each time the care of a patient is transferred from one provider to another.
  • List practices that support the safe administration of medications, including the five rights of medication administration.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML
Infectious Diseases and Infection Control in Radiology
Faculty: Lori Smith, BSN, MSN
Expiration Date: August 31, 2022
CE Credit Hours: 4.0
Tuition: No Charge
18969

All Infectious diseases acquired within the healthcare system are a serious and at times fatal problem facing healthcare providers and patients. Due to increases in antibiotic-resistance infections and Covid-19, it is essential that healthcare personnel understand how pathogens are transmitted and ways to prevent infection. Studies have confirmed the presence of infectious bacteria on equipment within the radiology suite and solidified the importance of proper decontamination. One study found a contaminated surface bore of the MRI unit to be positive for the presence of MRSA. Another study evaluating contamination of radiographic markers found that 92% of these devices were contaminated.

When discussing COVID-19 specifically, it has been discussed within recent literature that radiologic technologists who perform CT scans are at an increased risk of exposure to COVID-19. This also applies to radiology department staff performing other types of radiologic tests. Becoming familiar with the procedures set in place is essential in protecting radiologic technologists and those working with patients in the radiology setting from exposure to COVID-19 and other infectious diseases in all areas of radiology.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Understand and discuss the types of infectious diseases
  • Describe drug resistance
  • Discuss the inappropriate use of antibiotics and its effect on infections
  • Differentiate between gram positive versus gram negative bacteria
  • List gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria
  • Describe the characteristics of hospitalized patients that contribute to transmission of infectious diseases
  • Define the guidelines for effective hand-hygiene in healthcare settings
  • Describe types of isolation precautions
  • Discuss how to prevent infectious diseases in radiology
  • Discuss how to properly transport a patient within the healthcare facility
  • Understand and discuss aseptic technique in interventional radiology

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML
Joint Commission Medication Management Standards In Radiology - 3rd Edition
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: December 31, 2022
CE Credit Hours: 4.0
Tuition: No Charge
17599

The Joint Commission Medication Management Standards (Joint Commission) are among the most rigorous and challenging for an organization to implement, according to the article, Maintaining Compliance (Kienle, Uselton, Lee, 2008). Medication management standards, revised in 2014, (The Joint Commission, 2013) address all stages of the medication processes and are no longer viewed as primarily a pharmacy responsibility. The management of medications is considered a system-wide responsibility that impacts every clinical area in the facility.

Imaging services are assuming a more visible role in healthcare facilities. This increased visibility is directly related to the rapid development of sophisticated diagnostic technology as well as the increasing therapeutic use of imaging technology. As would be anticipated with this increase in activity and level of intervention, more regulations are being imposed to support the provision of safe and effective services.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML
MRI Risk Assessment of Implants & Foreign Bodies
Faculty: Tobias Gilk, M.Arch., MRSO, MRSE
Expiration Date: January 01, 2024
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
19921

Apart from no-show patients, clearing patients with implants, medical devices, or foreign bodies is one of the most time-consuming and delay-producing aspects of MRI care. In this presentation Toby Gilk will walk through the various legal duties and limitations relative to authorizing patients with foreign bodies to proceed with an MRI exam, with examples of both appropriate and inappropriate guiding policies.

Next, Mr. Gilk will walk you through ‘untangling’ the risks of scanning patients with devices, reducing one unsolvable mess into identifiable separate risks associated with the three different electromagnetic fields of the MRI: Static Magnetic Field; Time-Varying Gradients; and Radiofrequency Magnetic Fields. Finally, he’ll provide you with a simplified risk-assessment tool that can help evaluate potential risks of harm for every possible implant, device, shrapnel or foreign body.

After attending this webinar the participants will be better able to:

  1. Describe the duties of MRI technologists and radiologists relative to clearing patients in whom there are complications / contraindications.
  2. Articulate generally the legal boundaries related to patient clearance, risk and benefit assessments, and exam authorization.
  3. List the three MRI electromagnetic fields and the hazards each is responsible for.
  4. Utilize a sparse risk-assessment tool to make quick evaluations of potential risks for individual patients / individual studies.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

Webinar
Opportunities Beyond R.T. - Career Pathway Enhancement
Faculty: Jacqueline K. Peccerillo, R.T. (R)(CT)(BD)(PET)
Expiration Date: January 01, 2024
CE Credit Hours: 1.0
Tuition: No Charge
19920

Becoming a radiologic technologist (R.T.) is an exciting step in an individual’s career pathway. But, what happens afterwards? Radiologic technology extends beyond diagnostic imaging and includes clinical application specialists, educators, PACS administrators, RIS specialists, medical device representatives, researchers and much more. In training, student radiographers learn about the various modalities beyond general radiography like magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography , mammography, and bone densitometry. Once officially working as an R.T. in the clinical setting, with exposure to the above modalities, R.T.s may begin to question what they want to do next and seek opportunities for professional growth.

Health care is an interdisciplinary field, and R.T.s are exposed to a wealth of alternative modalities and employment opportunities. Which ones should you choose and how do you move into a new role? By researching the current job market, R.T.s can analyze trending opportunities and profitable positions. After identifying opportunities, a self-assessment must be performed to determine goals, strengths, and weaknesses.

In this practical and engaging webinar, Professor Jacqueline Peccerillo, R.T. (R)(CT)(BD)(PET), will share actionable strategies to uncover opportunities for professional growth and perform self-assessments to identify fitting opportunities. Professor Peccerillo will also share vignettes describing the journeys that other R.T.s have taken to reach their goals to help attendees take the next steps towards the wisest and most fitting career pathway enhancements.

After attending this webinar the participants will be better able to:

  1. Evaluate employment trends relative to the radiologic technologist profession.
  2. Establish SMART goals for career enhancement.
  3. Appraise personal strengths and weaknesses.
  4. Create a plan to achieve career goals.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

Webinar
Providing Safe Patient Care by Preventing Healthcare Acquired Conditions and Serious Reportable Events
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 3.0
Tuition: No Charge
20073

Many studies have demonstrated that one of the major causes of the increase in healthcare costs is related to unexpected treatment needed as the result of a medical error, a Serious Reportable Events, and/or a healthcare acquired condition.  While many insurers, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid, have stopped reimbursing hospitals for care and treatment needed following the commission of specifically defined medical errors, those costs still remain part of patient care delivery, leading to a reduction in funding available for other components of healthcare.

All who are involved in the delivery of patient care should be knowledgeable of, and fully implement infection-control programs, as well as any initiative put in place to avoid Never-Events/Serious Reportable Events, from occurring in the healthcare setting. The transformation needs to occur in the culture of the provision of healthcare to include a clear expectation of the individual responsibility of EACH person who is providing care.

This program will educate the healthcare provider on ways they can make a difference in the commitment of errors and reportable events during patient care.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Identify the major events in the history leading to the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 addressing costs of never-events to the healthcare system
  • Describe the basis for transformation of inpatient care as this relates to elimination of Serious Reportable Events
  • Discuss the needed cultural changes to successfully implement the transformation of inpatient care to the level of safety desired
  • Discuss critical aspects of infection control as they relate to the elimination of hospital-acquired infections
  • List the benefits of patient centered care as it relates to prevention of medical errors and Serious Reportable Events
  • Discuss the impact of identifying Serious Reportable Events and the potential for litigation if a Serious Reportable Events occurs
  • Discuss the accountability factor as it relates to Serious Reportable Events
  • Describe effective approaches to care delivery aimed at preventing Serious Reportable Event

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML
Radiation Dosing
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: January 31, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 3.5
Tuition: No Charge
16112

The Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alert (Number 47) focused on how to reduce risks related to the use of ionizing radiation while still maintaining a high level of quality of the image being obtained. While efforts to address the radiological exposure risks were being made by the FDA and CMS, “legislation mandating the monitoring of radiation dose and reporting of any radiation dose incidents” (itn, 2014) was passed in California and Texas moving issues related to radiation exposure from the ‘should do’ to the ‘must do’ position.

The legislation from California and Texas led to other states and professional organizations to increase the emphasis on radiation safety practices. The Joint Commission, looking to develop standardization of these practices, introduced a set of New and Revised Diagnostic Imaging Standards in December, 2013 (Mullens, 2014). While Joint Commission Standards are not considered law in the legal sense, they do carry the weight of ‘law’ when considered from the certification perspective since Joint Commission certification (or comparable certification from another accepted organization) is needed to participate in Medicare and Medicaid programs and with many other insurance providers.

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Discuss the brief history of the development of x-rays using ionizing radiation.
  • Identify ways in which people are exposed to radiation.
  • Discuss the intent of “As Low as Reasonably Achievable”.
  • Describe the relationship between medication reconciliation and recording of radiation exposures.
  • Define the dilemma that exists with the use of diagnostic radiation.
  • List the negative effects of radiation exposure.
  • Describe the intent of the Joint Commission Sentinel Event 47.
  • Discuss the steps, required by CMS, to be taken to reduce radiation exposure.
  • List the Joint Commission standards to be achieved as phase one of the newly defined standards to be achieved by 2015.
  • Describe meaningful use and radiology as it impacts radiation exposure.
  • Define major points included in the FDA news release of Feb. 9, 2010.
  • Discuss Imaging Gently and Imaging Wisely.
  • Discuss progress toward radiation dosing standards.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML
Radiology and Radiation Safety in the Delivery of Patient Care
Faculty: Joann C. Wilcox, RN, MSN, LNC
Expiration Date: June 30, 2023
CE Credit Hours: 2.25
Tuition: No Charge
20071

This course will describe the care and safety of the patient receiving non-interventional radiographic procedures and additional aspects of patient care being provided by the Radiology staff. Patient safety is defined as the prevention of harm and is a “fundamental right of all Americans” (Kizer & Blum, nd). Achieving this safe care is complex, and there are many obstacles in the way of accomplishing this level of care. It is recommended that all healthcare organizations make the safety of the patient a priority when delivering care and services to that patient. This priority can be introduced and implemented by the executive committee of the facility establishing patient safety programs with defined executive responsibility and with the creation of a culture of safety

Following completion of this program participants should be able to:

  • Pinpoint steps that should be taken to create and maintain a safe environment in which to provide care to patients.
  • Name the components of a Patient Safety Program.
  • Identify the two major groups of patient’s rights.
  • Describe an example of an error’s classification system.
  • Define Sentinel Event and provide an example of one addressing radiology services.
  • Discuss alternatives to punishing people for making mistakes.
  • Describe a method using an everyday product to improve patient safety.

Published by Creative Training Solutions, Inc.

This Publication is an educational activity supported by Guerbet LLC.

Available Format(s)
Click To Begin

PDF HTML